Sunday, April 11, 2010

Spring ephemerals

I love spring ephemerals. This year I have spent more time than usual observing the progression from the earliest scattered flowers to the carpet of blooms today on the Woodland Wildflower Trail.

Today I walked without dogs and children and was able to take a little time for photographs. These small pictures do not do the flowers justice, click on the images for a larger view.


Yellow Trillium - a toadshade trillium. Its flowers are sessile- meaning there is no stem or petiole joining the flower to the rest of the plant.
This could be a variety of Sweet Betsy, which does come in yellow.











Vasey's Trillium this is a easily overlooked trillium. Although its leaves are large the flowers are "nodding", ie. underneath on a stalk and not "sessile" ie. perched on top without a stem.

On the Botanical Garden Trail look to your right, by the stream as you walk from the Hunt Cabin and before you cross the small stone bridge by Crucible. There are several Vasey's Trillum by the small wooden bridge on the left bank of the stream. There is also a very nice crop of Yellowroot in flower in the same location.


Vasey's Trillium

Catesby's Trillium


A nodding, or wake robin trillium.










Once in a while a combination of plants takes your breath away. This grouping did not photograph well but was so striking that other people on the trail also pointed it out to us.
You can find it on the trail it is past Crucible and just past the new woodenbench* and on the left had side of the trail.

*Check out the bench dedication to a man and his dog- so sweet. (I believe the man's name was Gary Schramm).




Foam
flower, trillium and ferns

Mayapples are generally seen from above and appear as a lush swath of miniature umbrellas. I took this shot lying prostrate on the ground - a mouse's eye view of mayapple flowers.






Towering Mayapples


New bog garden in the new butterfly garden -pitcher plants
This is a wonderful new site in the garden -look at that pitcher plant flower!

1 comment:

lkw said...

That is an unusual pitcher plant flower! Maybe a hybrid?